Thank you, Jun Konno; ありがとう、紺野淳

Last week the world lost an angel among us when Jun Konno, founder of Ai Chi succumbed to a battle with cancer. This kind and gentle man and former Olympic swim coach for Japan was inspired to bridge fear of touch to relaxation for a small group of nervous aquatic clients in 1993. The resulting steps that he created for them to be able to participate in Watsu sessions has blossomed into a practice that is so broad in scope that it touches the lives of people around the world in healing ways. Ai Chi is now employed for those challenged in balance, breathing and loss of mobility, strength and endurance. Those experiencing stress and with PTSD find calm in doing Ai Chi. This warm water practice has been adapted for cooler water and for focus on specific aspects to meet individual physical and mindfulness needs. It has become an outlet for joyful expression and for centering in overwhelming situations.

How it turned out was exactly how it was meant to be, thanks to the spark that you ignited and the flames that you have stoked, Jun. We will miss your presence with us, but your memory will endure across the globe through Ai Chi. Thank you for sharing this gift with us. You have made the world a calmer and better place.

June 2017, with Jun Konno and Ruth Sova, (founder of ATRI and AEA, who promotes and shares worldwide Ai Chi practice)

Please register at the following link to join ATRI for a very special online Ai Chi Day on Sunday, July 25, in celebration of Jun Konno and Ai Chi:
https://ruth-sova-103927.square.site/product/ai-chi-day-2021/452?cs=true&cst=custom

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Writen by mpierce

MS PT, Northwestern University; BS PT, St Louis University; CEEAA; ATRIC; Ai Chi Trainer since 2015; De-Mystifying Mindfulness by Universiteit Leiden on Coursera, Certificate earned on November 4, 2017;

4 thoughts on “Thank you, Jun Konno; ありがとう、紺野淳

    1. Yes, he came to every Sanibel Symposium I attended up until COVID, and I was privileged to meet him several times. Such was a kind, gentle and conscientious spirit.

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