Overcoming COVID stigmas

In 2020 I started looking for ways to make a difference in the midst of a frightening new pandemic. I read books about the Spanish flu of the last century that took the lives of some in my family tree, and learned that the annual flu shots we have available today stave off the evolving ancestors of that flu, saving the lives of many to this day. There have been historic global illnesses in the distant past, but it is good to remember that we have been through a pandemic just a couple of generations ago and we have learned to build tools to deal with it.

I then took an online contact tracer certification course, but soon sadly found that practicing my new skill would be difficult due to surprising responses on opposite ends of the spectrum. One place where I spend time chose not to provide any opportunities for this job which involves sharing news no one wants to hear, and another only offered full time positions, which was more than I felt I could handle.

Then came the realization that COVID did not end after a couple of weeks of illness for some of the survivors. Part of the population experiences a wild roller coaster ride of a broad array of continuous or intermittent symptoms, impacting their daily lives profoundly. This prompted me to explore the mounting research on the ill-defined phenomena that has been called long COVID, post-acute sequelae of SARS CoV-2 (PASC) or post-COVID syndrome, and I realized that Ai Chi could be helpful in addressing some of the more prominent symptoms. *Look for a manuscript I wrote about this in the December 2022 special COVID edition of the Journal of Aquatic Physical Therapy entitled “Ai Chi for Long COVID: Transitioning to a Post-Rehab Community Program.”

I then proposed a session on community Ai Chi for post-rehab COVID long haulers for an aquatic conference in early 2022, however it did not draw enough interest to hold the class. I then collaborated with an aquatic physical therapist knowledgeable in subacute rehab for long COVID and an aquatic expert in PTSD for a COVID Long Haulers Roundtable discussion at a larger aquatic conference later in the year. We were excited that it brought a high number of attendees from the United States and from around the world for the final class of the conference. They listened attentively and gave positive feedback on our presentations, but there was little discussion on behalf of the participants. Why is there such hesitancy around this topic?

I believe it comes down to a social stigma associated with COVID-19. We all want COVID to just go away, which has resulted in some minimizing its presence and others becoming hyper-vigilant, (a difficult task as best practices for dealing with this brand new virus emerged very slowly over time). The diversity of responses to COVID has made even talking about it a taboo for the majority of people who are tired of a world already filled with conflict. One person in our audience shared with me that she did not want to ask any questions or make comments because she did not want to risk upsetting anyone else.

This stigma is so strong that those who contract COVID worry about others judging them. Will people think they were socially irresponsible, without regard for other people’s health? Will they be villainized or ostracized by acquaintances, friends and family? This can lead to feelings of personal shame and a tendency to hide a positive test or illness from others, or to downplay their experience and not seek help when they need it. And because of this, we can only guess at the true prevalence of COVID or long COVID.

So what can we do in the face of these stigmas, as community aquatic exercise providers? Be aware that these stigmas exist. Set an example by being compassionate, non-judgmental and mindful in your communications with all. Use comforting, inclusive language and avoid terms which could be interpreted as marginalizing. One aquatic provider shared that she feared that her classes would shrink if they were marketed for COVID long haulers. While Long COVID is not a contagious disease that would preclude participation with others, her realization of the impact of this stigma is an important one.

COVID long haulers who want to improve breath, attention and focus, energy levels, strength and balance will find their way to Ai Chi classes, along with those with many other conditions who share these goals. Yes, we need to be aware of and support necessary adaptations for the special needs of each of our clients, but marketing and working from a goal oriented approach rather than a diagnostic one preserves personal privacy and offers protection against stigmatization. And if you find yourself in the midst of a discussion about long COVID, acknowledge the feelings your clients express, listen attentively and feel empowered to correct misconceptions with proven scientific data. Sharing Ai Chi is a gift you can give to everyone.

More information on this important topic is available from The World Health Organization (WHO) in their briefing, “Social Stigma associated with COVID-19.”

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Writen by mpierce

MS PT, Northwestern University; BS PT, St Louis University; CEEAA; ATRIC; Ai Chi Trainer since 2015; De-Mystifying Mindfulness by Universiteit Leiden on Coursera, Certificate earned on November 4, 2017;

2 thoughts on “Overcoming COVID stigmas

  1. This is a very interesting point, I think a lot of people either feel the stigma of having COVID, apply the stigma, or both, but we don’t talk about it. Thank you for your blog post

    1. Thank you for your insightful comment. It is important to remember that COVID is very new and is constantly evolving in unexpected ways. The easy, but unfair and unhelpful route is to create stigmas~ but a focus on reasonable goals can make life better.

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