Dizzy

You may encounter Ai Chi participants who experience dizziness or lightheadedness while doing Ai Chi. As there are many causes for dizziness, some of which are quite serious, it is important for participants to explore the roots of their symptoms with their medical providers. Participants who are cleared for aquatic exercise but still have some issues with dizziness may need to modify their exercise routines to avoid setting off their symptoms. For example, those with vestibular involvement may experience dizziness with the turning postures of “freeing,” “reflecting” and “suspending.” Slowing down or omitting those postures may be a way to avoid triggering symptoms.

Those with orthostatic hypotension, (also known as postural hypotension) have a condition where blood pressure drops with changing body positions, such as moving from sitting to standing. This condition elicits lightheadedness, dizziness or even fainting when blood is not able to travel efficiently throughout the body’s circulatory system. A broad array of issues may cause orthostatic hypotension, but participants need proper diagnosis, treatment and to be medically stable before proceeding with Ai Chi practice.

Even those with orthostatic hypotension that is well controlled on land may experience blood pressure related symptoms as they leave the water, due to changes in hydrostatic pressure. Hydrostatic pressure is the static force of water exerted on the body. The beneficial effects of hydrostatic pressure include decreasing pain and edema, which promotes joint mobility; it assists in release of air during exhalation to enhance breathing. And importantly, it helps decrease blood pooling in the extremities by providing a compression force to increase venous return. When this extra assistance for circulation is suddenly relieved upon leaving the water, blood may pool in the legs resulting in a blood pressure drop, and causing lightheadedness or other blood pressure related symptoms. A staged exit from the water can help assist in a smooth transition from water to land.

Providing a little extra time and thoughtful attention to transitions can bring a rewarding experience to Ai Chi practice for those with dizziness.

To follow this blog, scroll down and tap “follow” in the lower right corner.

Writen by mpierce

MS PT, Northwestern University; BS PT, St Louis University; CEEAA; ATRIC; Ai Chi Trainer since 2015; De-Mystifying Mindfulness by Universiteit Leiden on Coursera, Certificate earned on November 4, 2017;

Join the discussion

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.