The wild card~ personal music preference

Studies have defined objective traits of relaxing music, but the final component that can make or break stress reduction in an individual is subjective~ whether or not the person “likes” the music.

Not surprisingly, some of the information on the area of personal preference comes from marketing research~ research done with the intent of creating a feeling or emotional connection to commercial brands or products. Whether or not individual marketing researchers follow strict scientific method which can be applied to a general population is unknown~ they are not bound by the same stringent standards as scientific researchers. These standards include assurance that the researcher seeks to be objective and neutral, that the study can be replicated, that the study participants accurately represent the target population, and that the research is done in such a way that it is considered valid by statistical analysis, using equipment that provides accurate and reliable results. Companies spend billions of dollars to reap the benefits of accurate research, but because the studies are proprietary they are not available for public interpretation.

A British marketing research company headed by a neuropsychologist called Mindlab measures responses to target areas through numerous tools and measures. They collect data on brain waves, facial muscle contraction, skin moisture, heart rate and heart rate variances to learn about attention, positive motivation, emotion, cognitive load, and sympathetic and parasympathetic responses. Using this data they develop presentations that promote desired associations in most people. This is the strategy that went into developing “the world’s most relaxing song,” Weightless by Marconi Union. Listening to this music reportedly reduces anxiety by 65% and reduces physiological resting rates by 35%. A 10-hour recording of this music is available on youtube.com. I may be in the minority, but the problem for me is that I don’t like this music. Regardless of the research, it is highly unlikely that I would listen to it.

What kind of relaxing music do I turn to for Ai Chi? The first year I practiced Ai Chi I did so solely to Jun Kono’s Ai Chi Synchrony, imbedding strong relaxing associations for me. The second year I started looking for variety, and I turned to some of my old favorites. Music affects many parts of our minds, including the amygdala, which is linked to emotion and memory. I learned to play the acoustic guitar in my early teenage years and spent many hours playing both alone and with friends. Playing the guitar helped me center during this often turbulent stage of change and transition. And later as an adult when I drove between workplace sites, I found myself tuning to the Coffee House Sirius XM radio station, especially on stressful days. This music that helped me center during my formative years has continued to lift my spirits throughout my life. So my relaxing music list includes acoustic guitar music.

I love to travel and explore new places and different cultures. On a trip to South America my husband and I discovered the haunting sounds of Incan panpipes as we explored Incan ruins. And later on a family trip through the four corners area our son purchased a wooden flute. Shortly after we dispersed to explore an Indian pueblo, the unexpected soothing sounds of his flute echoed through the clay dwellings and we found him playing in a small, ancient room. These special memories put panpipe and Native American flute music on my relaxing list.

The analytical approach can only go so far~ in the end, relaxing music is personal, and stress-reduction starts with a relaxed leader. I like different music on different days. And as an Ai Chi instructor, I share a variety of relaxing music that I like with my classes, and make choices within my own library of music based on their responses. There is no “one size fits all” music.

Writen by mpierce

MS PT, Northwestern University; BS PT, St Louis University; CEEAA; ATRIC; Ai Chi Trainer since 2015; De-Mystifying Mindfulness by Universiteit Leiden on Coursera, Certificate earned on November 4, 2017;

One thought on “The wild card~ personal music preference

  1. Today I bit the bullet and did Ai Chi to Weightless for the first time, despite not liking the music,. I have to admit that I felt very relaxed afterwards. Has anyone else experienced this? What’s your favorite Ai Chi music?

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