More or less

As a physical therapist, I have found that many clients assume that faster recovery is dependent on longer therapy sessions or more vigorous exercise. This is in fact a myth. The truth is that while there are times when the best results come by pushing limits, there are also times when pacing is the key to success. In Scandinavia this middle ground is referred to as “lagom,” not too much, not too little. With attention to known information about disease processes, health professionals are tasked to listen to and observe their patients to determine that “sweet spot” of lagom for best outcomes.

Our world is now consumed by a novel virus that we are still learning about. We do not have a complete picture of the disease processes involved, but our understanding of it is emerging. Thankfully, an array of relatively quickly developed vaccines have been successful in curtailing the spread and severity of COVID-19, but not before many had contracted it. While more than we ever thought possible have succumbed to it, it is estimated that millions of people worldwide live with the aftermath, experiencing a wide range of persistent mild to debilitating symptoms, even after just a light case of the virus. Long haulers have turned to exercise to combat physical deconditioning and fatigue, with inconsistent responses. An editorial in the May 2021 Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy was co-authored by researchers and by both those who have experienced long COVID and those with prolonged post-viral symptoms from another multi-system virus, myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome. The article brings home the message of “lagom” to avoid relapses, which may take hours or even days to emerge. Their message is simple:

STOP trying to push your limits. Overexertion may be detrimental to your recovery.
REST is your most important management strategy. Do not wait until you feel symptoms to rest.
PACE your daily physical and cognitive activities. This is a safe approach to navigate triggers of symptoms.

How do you find that balance of “not too much, not too little?” The Borg Scale of Perceived Exertion is a good tool to find your personal pace (see March 15, 2017 Ai Chi Plus blog post, “Stretch your limits”). Start off by working or doing daily activities at a “fairly light” level (green range), even if it seems too easy. As your endurance improves you will find that what was “fairly light” initially is now very light and you will be able to do a bit more without ill effect. The Borg scale can be applied to everything from length of time out of bed, to walking distance, to exercise regimes~ even to doing Ai Chi steps that challenge core strength, balance, breath, mobility and reduce stress. Pace yourself to find that moving target of lagom.

If you are patient and pace yourself, you will get there!

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Writen by mpierce

MS PT, Northwestern University; BS PT, St Louis University; CEEAA; ATRIC; Ai Chi Trainer since 2015; De-Mystifying Mindfulness by Universiteit Leiden on Coursera, Certificate earned on November 4, 2017;

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